Exhibitions


  • Jean Lecomte du Nouÿ (French, 1842-1923)
    Judith, 1875
    Oil on panel, 12 5/8 x 8 3/8 in.
    Dahesh Museum of Art, New York. 1999.3

  • Alexandre Cabanel (French, 1823-1889)
    The Death of Moses, 1851
    Oil on canvas, 110 x 154 in.
    Dahesh Museum of Art, New York. 1997.1

  • Gustave Doré (French, 1832-1883)
    Moses before the Pharaoh, 1878
    Charcoal, pen and ink wash on paper, 30 1/4 x 41 1/4 in.
    Dahesh Museum of Art, New York. 1999.1

  • Hans Andersen Brendekilde (Danish, 1857-1942)
    Abel's Offer, 1908
    Oil on canvas, 77 1/2 x 141 3/4 inches
    Dahesh Museum of Art, New York. 1995.100

  • Jean-Léon Gérôme (French, 1824-1904)
    Bathsheba, ca. 1895
    Plaster, 33 1/16 in. (including proper base)
    Dahesh Museum of Art, New York. 2002.17

  • François-Joseph Navez (Belgian, 1787-1869)
    The Holy Family with Saint John the Baptist and Saint Elizabeth, 1823
    Oil on canvas, 53 15/16 x 42 1/8 in.
    Dahesh Museum of Art, New York. 2001.18

  • Paul Delaroche (French, 1797-1856)
    Lamentation, 1820
    Oil on canvas, 19 1/4 x 12 3/4 inches
    Dahesh Museum of Art, New York. 1999.7

  • Franck Kirchbach (German, 1859-1912)
    Christ and the Children, 1894
    Oil on canvas, 114 1/2 x 151 1/4 inches
    Dahesh Museum of Art, New York. 1995.3

  • Léon-Joseph-Florentine Bonnat (French, 1833-1922)
    Jacob Wrestling the Angel, 1876
    Pencil and black chalk on paper, 20 3/4 x 14 1/2 inches
    Dahesh Museum of Art, New York. 2002.30


Sacred Visions

Nineteenth-Century Biblical Art from the Dahesh Museum Collection

October 18, 2013–January 19, 2014

Comprised of approximately 30 works of art, Sacred Visions: Nineteenth-Century Biblical Art from the Dahesh Museum Collection highlights how biblical subject matter was embraced within the academies of 19th-century Europe. Historically ranked at the top of the Academy’s hierarchy of genres, biblical depictions of both Old and New Testament subjects enjoyed a resurgence in the 19th century. This renewed interest may be attributed to several factors, including the developing field of biblical archaeology and the advent of photography, which produced travel books of the Holy Land. During this century of political and religious upheaval, artists - and the larger societies of which they were a part - looked to the Bible to provide inspiration, often in the form of allegory, for contemporary circumstances.

Click here to read an introductory essay to the exhibtion by Sarah Schaefer, co-curator of the exhibition.

 

Major support for MOBIA’s exhibitions and programs is provided by American Bible Society and by Howard and Roberta Ahmanson.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

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