Exhibitions


  • Installation shot.

  • Installation shot.

  • Installation shot.


Scripture, Image, Life

Orthodox Christianity

October 16, 2009–January 24, 2010

Orthodox Christianity traces its lineage to apostolic times. Constantine, the first Christian emperor of Rome, moved the capital of the empire to the ancient city of Byzantium, rededicating it as Constantinople in 330 A.D. In the sixth century Greek became the official language of the empire and the Church by imperial decree. The language of the New Testament became the language of “New Rome,” replacing the Latin of “Old Rome” - a development to which Orthodoxy traces its enduring Greek heritage. Though having fallen in 1453 to the Ottoman Turks, Constantinople, now known as Istanbul, remains the heart of the Orthodox tradition. Objects on view, including icons, volumes of sacred scripture and a liturgical psalter in Greek, maps, and rare architectural portraits of Constantinople, testify to Orthodoxy’s history, its unbroken line of ecclesiastical authority, its widespread cultural legacy, the transformation of its capitol city, and its ability to preserve itself as well as adapt itself to the most pressing religious, human, and ecological matters of the day.

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1865 Broadway at 61st Street
New York, NY 10023
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