Exhibitions


  • Benton, Return of the Prodigal Son, 1939

  • Robert Hodgell (1922-2000), The Prodigal Son, 1960, Linoleum cut, Collection of Luther Seminary; Gift of Jerry Evenrud

  • Jacques Lipchitz (1891-1973), Return of the Prodigal Son, 1931, Bronze, Marlborough International Fine Art

  • Jean Le Clerc (1587-1633), Parable of the Prodigal Son (series of six), 17th century, Engraving, Collection of Luther Seminary; Gift of Jerry Evenrud

  • Mary McCleary (1951- ), Prodigal Son, 1996, Mixed media collage on paper, From the collection of Ellen Tuchman and Harry Orenstein, Dallas, Texas

  • James Tissot (1836-1902), The Parable of the Prodigal Son (two of a series of five), 1881, Etching & drypoint, Collection of Luther Seminary; Gift of Jerry Evenrud

  • James McNeill Mesple (1948- ), The Far Country - Chicago (series of three), 1998, Colored pencil, watercolor, Collection of Luther Seminary; Gift of Jerry Evenrud

  • Christian Rholfs (1849-1938), Return of the Prodigal Son, 1916, Woodcut, Collection of Luther Seminary; Gift of Jerry Evenrud

  • Benjamin Miller (1877-1964), The Prodigal Son with Pigs, 1925, Woodcut, Collection of Luther Seminary; Gift of Jerry Evenrud

  • Timothy Vermeulen (1960- ), Return of the Prodigal Son, 2000, Oil on panel, Collection of Luther Seminary; Gift of Jerry Evenrud


The Art of Forgiveness

Images of the Prodigal Son

October 04, 2007–February 17, 2008

The biblical story from Luke 15 of the loving father who forgives his wayward son has inspired artists through the centuries. MOBIA organized and presented an exhibition dedicated to this theme, featuring works from the Renaissance to the present day.

More than 50 prints, sculptures, and paintings by artists including Rembrandt, Pietro Testa and James Tissot provided a wide-ranging overview of the impact this theme has had on the history of art. One section of the exhibition was dedicated to the private collection of Jerry Evenrud, a musician and art enthusiast who has collected artworks depicting the Prodigal Son. Representative works featuring this story were lent by major European and American museums. Educational programs included a lecture series discussing the impact of the parable on art, literature and theology, featuring Tobias Wolff, well-known author of This Boy’s Life and other works and a lecture by Holly Flora, assistant professor of Art History at Tulane University and the exhibition curator.


This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. Support for The Art of Forgiveness has been provided by the following generous individuals: Sandra and Robert Bowden, Hester Diamond, Walter and Darlene Hansen, and Robert Keller. Major support for MOBIA’s exhibitions and programs has been provided by the American Bible Society and by Fieldstead and Company.

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