Exhibitions


  • Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, New York.
    Head of St. Andrew (Detail from the Last Supper composition), ca. 1897.
    Glass tesserae and plaster.
    Lillian Nassau, LLC, New York, NY.

  • Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, New York. Joseph Lauber, desginer.
    Fathers of the Church, ca. 1892.
    Glass tesserae and plaster.
    Exhibited at the 1893 World’s Colombian Exposition in Chicago. 
    The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass, Long Island City, NY.

  • Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, New York
    The Soldier of the Lord, ca. 1900
    Leaded glass
    34” x 28”
    The Collection of Richard H. Driehaus, Chicago, IL
    (40161)

  • Tiffany Studios, New York.Design attributed to Edward P. Sperry.
    Lydia Entertaining Christ and the Apostles (Griffin Memorial Window), before 1910.
    Centennial Church, Chicago, IL.
    The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass, Long Island City, NY.

  • Tiffany Studios, New York. Frederick Wilson, designer.
    Salve Regina window, after 1910.
    Memorial Hall of Stonywold Sanatorium, Lake Kushaqua, New York.
    The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass, Long Island City, NY.

  • Tiffany Studios, New York. Frederick Wilson, designer.
    The Righteous Shall Receive a Crown of Glory (Brainard Memorial Window), ca. 1901.
    Leaded glass.
    Methodist Church, Waterville, NY.
    Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY.

  • Tiffany, Louis Comfort (1848-1933)
    Design for marble pulpit, ca. 1895-1900.
    Watercolor, glazing media, pen and inks, including brown ink and bronze metallic ink, and graphite on off-white wove paper, 9 13/16 x 14 7/8 in.
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
    Photo Credit : Image copyright © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

  • Tiffany, Louis Comfort (1848-1933)
    Design for baptismal font, ca. 1902-20.
    Watercolor, brown wash, and graphite on off-white wove paper (or artist board) in original warm grey matt. Overall: 15 11/16 x 12 3/4 in.
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
    Photo Credit : Image copyright © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

  • Tiffany, Louis Comfort (1848-1933)
    Design for figural window, ca. 1910-20.
    Gouache and watercolor over silver gelatin photograph collage and watercolor, pen and black India ink, and graphite on wove paper support: 16 9/16 x 11 13/16 in.
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
    Photo Credit : Image copyright © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

  • Tiffany Studios, New York
    I Am the Resurrection and the Life, 1902
    Leaded glass
    50 1/4” x 29”
    The Collection of Richard H. Driehaus, Chicago, IL
    (40058)


Louis C. Tiffany and the Art of Devotion

October 12, 2012–January 20, 2013

Louis C. Tiffany and the Art of Devotion considers the array of church decorations and memorials that Louis C. Tiffany (1848-1933) produced beginning in the early 1880s. For 50 years, working under a variety of company names, Tiffany oversaw production and marketing of a vast assortment of decorative elements for many of America’s leading congregations—Protestant, Catholic and Jewish. Tiffany employed designers, draftsmen, and craftspeople who produced decorative wall treatments, mosaic floors, lighting, furniture, altarpieces, pulpits, candlesticks, and liturgical vestments. A large component of the business of religious art also consisted of funerary memorials that ranged from simple bronze tablets and single headstones to leaded-glass windows and fully decorated mausolea. Works in many media—marble, glass, wood, metal, and fabric—could be had “off the rack” with minimal personalization or as one-of-a-kind commissions, designed exclusively for a particular patron. 

The success of Tiffany’s vision—measured in part by his prodigious output through his long career—was due not only to the quality and variety of the work, but to his ambitious advertising campaigns.  Through a combination of showroom displays, sales catalogues, press releases, luxurious illustrated pamphlets, and installations made for national and international expositions, Tiffany ably marketed his designs to the public and clients alike.  Through these various outlets, high-quality church and memorial designs became synonymous with his signature brand, Tiffany Studios. 

Louis C. Tiffany and the Art of Devotion considers the breadth and depth of the firm’s oeuvre, and the place Tiffany Studios created for itself in American religious art. Featuring the leaded-glass windows most often associated with Tiffany, as well as mosaics, watercolor sketches of windows, interiors and ecclesiastic furniture, and archival photographs, the exhibition shows how Tiffany continued the grand tradition of religious art, transforming it to suit an American audience. 

The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog published by D. Giles LTD of London.

 

Major support for MOBIA’s exhibitions and programs has been provided by American Bible Society and by Howard and Roberta Ahmanson. 

Louis C. Tiffany and the Art of Devotion is made possible by the generous support of the Henry Luce Foundation, the Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation, North Avenue Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, and the Corning Incorporated Foundation. 

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

MOBIA acknowledges the support of The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass for conservation studio and storage space.

Support for children's educational programs is provided, in part, by TD Charitable Foundation.

 

 

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